1. Certain Nissan vehicles are shutting themselves off while driving

    thanks to busted ball springs in the ignition switch, with a hearty assist from heavy keychains.

    In August 2017, the ignition switch supplier (Alpha Technology Corp.) told Nissan a problem occurred during manufacturing of the ignition switch ball springs. New tests were created for the ignition switches and how they would function on rough roads during vibrations of the vehicles.

    Tests concluded that those ball springs are giving out way too early. And without springs to support the weight of heavy key chains bouncing around on bumpy roads, the ignition is slipping itself from the “on” to “accessory” position.

    To make sure drivers don’t suddenly find themselves cruising down the highway with their radios on and their engines off, Nissan is recalling over 150,000 vehicles.

    If this all sounds familiar you might be thinking of Chevrolet’s long nightmare with faulty ignition switches. In fact, maybe now is a good time to mention the Chevrolet City Express has found its way into an otherwise all Nissan lineup of recalled vehicles. Seems like more than a coincidence.

    The one key difference is that Nissan’s airbag systems have an electrical capacity reserve, which means they should still stay on even with the ignition in the “accessory” position. Chevy owners weren’t so lucky.

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  2. Anyone else remember what the world felt like before all these Takata recalls?

    I’m starting to forget considering the first one came all the way back in May of 2013. I’m pretty sure the air smelled sweeter, the birds all sang in harmony, and I didn’t cry overtime I heard a word ending in “ata.”

    Anyway, I guess these batch recalls are our new reality. Nissan announced they’re pulling back 53,000 Versa sedans and hatchbacks to replace the passenger-side airbag inflators.

    Takata has been in the news a lot lately, and none of it has been good – more confirmed casualties and stop-driving orders have prompted questions from our much-maligned Senators. Ooo, I have a question – what the heck took them so long?

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  3. Last year, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) opened an investigation into braking issues in over 600,000 vehicles.

    Owners with certain 2013 and 2014 cars had been complaining that their pedals went to the floor in a terrifying moment of complete brake failure.

    Nissan said the problem was likely a bad seal inside the master cylinder and they changed the design in September 2013. Guess what happened when they did that? Yep, a sudden decrease in warranty claims.

    Despite the evidence, NHTSA says it could only link three crashes to the pre-redesigned master cylinders and opted to close the investigation without requesting a recall.

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