1. A lawsuit claiming Nissan's automatic emergency braking (AEB) system has dangerous defects will continue in court

    following a U.S. District Court judge tossing out the automaker's motion to dismiss. AEB systems monitor the road and can apply the brakes if the system detects a collision is imminnent. But according to the lawsuit, Nissan's AEB detects items that aren't there and can randomly bring the car to a screeching halt.…

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  2. Nissan is recalling 341,000 Altima sedans for the second time to stop the rear doors from unlatching when the windows are rolled down.

    The door’s latch-lock cable is interfering with the window regulator and previous attempts to re-route the cable didn’t work.

    Nissan’s new plan involves a different route for the cable and harness clips to keep everything in place. Whoever came up with the first plan should be shown the door.

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  3. Nissan has been hit with another lawsuit for their forward emergency braking system

    that detects objects that aren’t really there. Instead of protecting drivers, system creates perfect conditions for rear-end and side crashes. A safety feature that actually causes crashes? Talk about awwwkward.

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  4. Does Nissan's automatic emergency braking (AEB) system have a defective radar?

    A California lawsuit says malfunctions in the system create random emergency braking situations when the radar detects objects that aren’t really there.

    The owner's manuals for many of the vehicles admit the automatic emergency braking systems do "not function in all driving, traffic, weather and road conditions.” But the plaintiff says the manual leaves out the part about how the systems can cause vehicles to suddenly stop even when no objects are in the driving lane.

    It’s scary to think that a safety system might actually create more crash scenarios than it prevents.

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  5. A CVT lawsuit will proceed after a judge approved most of the plaintiffs' claims

    in a class-action Nissan asked the court to dismiss. The[lawsuit accuses the automaker of concealing transmission defects since 2012 and covers owners of the 2013-2014 Altima in California, New York, and Pennsylvania.

    Nissan argued those claims didn't hold because the plaintiffs had not adequately pleaded any of its express or implied warranty claims. However, the judge ruled claims about express and implied warranties survive, which automatically means Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act claims survive.

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  6. Altima owners have been waiting for a recall and/or extended warranty for the terrible continuously variable transmission (CVT)

    in the 2013 and 2014 model years. Well, certain owners decided they’ve waited long enough and sued Nissan.…

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  7. Nissan is recalling a whole bunch of Altimas because their hoods can fly open at any time.

    625,000 cars, in fact. That's a lot of latches that aren't latchin'. Nissan says the problem is with a secondary latch that sticks when the hood is closed. Here's a breakdown of what you need to know about the recall.…

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