Latest Versa Recall News

There's a lot of news out there, but not all of it matters. We try to boil down it to the most important bits about things that actually help you with your car problem. Interested in getting these stories in an email? Signup for free email alerts over at CarComplaints.com.

  1. Certain Nissan vehicles are shutting themselves off while driving

    thanks to busted ball springs in the ignition switch, with a hearty assist from heavy keychains.

    In August 2017, the ignition switch supplier (Alpha Technology Corp.) told Nissan a problem occurred during manufacturing of the ignition switch ball springs. New tests were created for the ignition switches and how they would function on rough roads during vibrations of the vehicles.

    Tests concluded that those ball springs are giving out way too early. And without springs to support the weight of heavy key chains bouncing around on bumpy roads, the ignition is slipping itself from the “on” to “accessory” position.

    To make sure drivers don’t suddenly find themselves cruising down the highway with their radios on and their engines off, Nissan is recalling over 150,000 vehicles.

    If this all sounds familiar you might be thinking of Chevrolet’s long nightmare with faulty ignition switches. In fact, maybe now is a good time to mention the Chevrolet City Express has found its way into an otherwise all Nissan lineup of recalled vehicles. Seems like more than a coincidence.

    The one key difference is that Nissan’s airbag systems have an electrical capacity reserve, which means they should still stay on even with the ignition in the “accessory” position. Chevy owners weren’t so lucky.

    keep reading
  2. Anyone else remember what the world felt like before all these Takata recalls?

    I’m starting to forget considering the first one came all the way back in May of 2013. I’m pretty sure the air smelled sweeter, the birds all sang in harmony, and I didn’t cry overtime I heard a word ending in “ata.”

    Anyway, I guess these batch recalls are our new reality. Nissan announced they’re pulling back 53,000 Versa sedans and hatchbacks to replace the passenger-side airbag inflators.

    Takata has been in the news a lot lately, and none of it has been good – more confirmed casualties and stop-driving orders have prompted questions from our much-maligned Senators. Ooo, I have a question – what the heck took them so long?

    keep reading
  3. Ugh, Takata – amirite?

    The automakers are sick of it. I'm sick of it. I sure as heck know you're sick of it too. But here we are – staring down another recall of 152,000 Nissan and Infiniti vehicles.

    By now I'm guessing you've heard about the dangers of Takata airbags, but here's a quick recap:

    1. Over time Takata airbag inflators are susceptible to moisture.
    2. When that moisture mixes with the airbag's propellant, the inflators become unstable and can explode sending shrapnel throughout the cabin.
    3. The problem is responsible for 11 deaths in the USA alone.

    Mazda has now recalled more than 1 million vehicles for this problem. Find out if yours is on the most recent list.

    keep reading
  4. Well, that didn't take long.

    The 2017 Nissan Versa has been recalled because of problems with the side-curtain airbags-and-seat-belts. Airbag supplier Autoliv was conducting routine testing in August when a side curtain airbag tore during deployment. After contacting Nissan about the malfunction, engineers determined the reinforcement stitching on the airbags may not properly secure two fabric sections of the curtain airbags.

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  5. When airbag supplier, Autoliv, was conducting some routine side curtain airbag testing they noticed something alarming

    --- the reinforcement stitching in the airbags sent to Nissan wasn't securing the airbag properly. The improper stitching is enough to cause the airbag to tear at the sewn seam when the airbag deploys.

    Nissan checked federal regulations to see if the problem was bad enough to order a recall, and although changes were made during assembly, the automaker said a recall was necessary. The recall affects any 2017 Nissan Versa built between 08/01/2016 and 08/16/2016.

    Interestingly, the 2012 Versa is under investigation for side curtain airbags that deploy when it's not wanted. Apparently Nissan and Autoliv haven't heard of the Goldilocks Principle.

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  6. Nissan is recalling 402,000 vehicles, mostly Infiniti vehicles, with dangerous Takata airbag inflators.

    This latest round of recalls has been split into what the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is calling "zones" across the country.

    See the full list of recalled vehicles.

    Takata's metal inflators are at risk of exploding because they don't contain a drying agent called desiccate. Over time, the ammonium nitrate inside the inflator can become unstable when exposed to heat and humidity. If they do explode during an airbag deployment, metal shrapnel shoots throughout the cabin, injuring or killing the people inside.

    Nissan, like other automakers, doesn't have enough replacement parts to fix their vehicles. This is the largest recall in US history with 70 million cars affected and parts are scarce.

    Owners should get an initial recall notice in the mail, and then another when parts become available.

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  7. Nissan's Occupant Classification System (OCS) has been the subject of two recalls in the past couple years, but a lawsuit says the fixes aren't working.

    Plaintiff Matthew Senci filed the proposed class-action lawsuit that alleges the vehicles have occupant classification system software that can incorrectly classify a front passenger seat as empty when it's occupied by an adult passenger.

    The error can cause the airbag to deactivate and fail to deploy in a crash and the lawsuit alleges Nissan has known about the problem since at least 2012 due to complaints and warranty claims.

    The first "limited" recall was in February 2013, but the fix was ineffective. A second, larger recall was announced in March 2014, but once again the lawsuit says the fix didn't do diddly.

    The lawsuit, Matthew Senci v. Nissan North America, Inc., accuses the automaker of unfair and deceptive acts and seeks damages for the decreased value of the cars.

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